academic journal

Designing and implementing a PBL course on educational digital video production: Lessons learned from a design-based research

Article published in Educational Technology Research & Development.
This paper reports on a design-based research (DBR) process for designing, implementing, and refining a problem-based learning (PBL) course on educational digital video (DV) use and production at the University of Lapland’s Faculty of Education. The study focuses on the students’ learning processes and outcomes from the viewpoint of meaningful learning. The research subjects included two pilot students and ten students enrolled in the course. To promote the reliability of the findings, data of various kinds and from multiple sources were used, including video recordings of the PBL tutorial sessions. The results suggest that PBL offers a good model to support students’ knowledge and skills in producing and using educational DV. In addition, the results suggest that DV production can be used as a method to learn about the subject matter of the DVs.

Table of contents: 

Design-based research - Meaningful learning - Problem-based learning - Students-as-video-producers

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Author

Päivi Hakkarainen

Year

2007

ISBN

ISSN 1042-1629 (Print) 1556-6501 (Online)

Length

Pages 211-228

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Towards Meaningful Learning through Digital Video Supported, Case Based Teaching

Article published in Australasian Journal of Educational Technology. This paper reports an action research case study in which a traditional lecture based, face to face Network Management course at the University of Lapland's Faculty of Social Sciences was developed into two different course versions resorting to case based teaching: a face to face version and an online version. In the face to face version, the teacher designed and produced three digital video supported case studies with the students to be used as learning material for the online version. The research focuses on finding out the student perspective on the following questions: (1) Can designing and producing digital video supported cases constitute a meaningful learning process for the students? (2) Can solving digital video supported cases in an online course support meaningful learning for the students? and (3) What roles do the digital videos play in the online students' meaningful learning process? The research indicates that both designing and producing, as well as solving the digital video supported cases, promoted especially the active and contextual aspects of the students' meaningful learning as well as the students' positive emotional involvement in the learning process. Several implications for further development of the Network Management course and for the development of university teaching across disciplines can be drawn from the results.

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Päivi Hakkarainen, Tarja Saarelainen and Heli Ruokamo, University of Lapland, Finland

Year

2007

Length

23 pages

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Meaningful Learning with Digital and Online Videos: Theoretical Perspectives

Abstract on Ed/ITLib: "In this paper theoretical perspectives for analyzing the pedagogical meaningfulness of using videos in teaching, studying and learning are presented and discussed with a special focus on using digital and online video materials. The theoretical arguments were applied in the international JIBS – Joint Inserts Bank for Schools project (see < http://www.ebu.ch/departments/television/co_finance/jibs.php>). Out of existing theoretical literature six characteristics of meaningful learning were selected. According to these characteristics, meaningful learning is 1) active, 2) constructive and individual, 3) collaborative and conversational, 4) contextual, 5) guided, and 6) emotionally involving and motivating. In this paper, these characteristics are discussed with a special focus on learning with digital and online video materials. The characteristics provide insights into how digital and online videos can be used in a pedagogically meaningful way in teaching, studying and learning processes. It is evident that videos viewed either through television or computer can be seen as tools for learning. However, videos are just one component in the complexity of a classroom activity system. The learning outcomes depend largely on the way videos are used as part of the overall learning environment, e.g. how viewing or producing videos is integrated into other learning resources and tasks."

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Author

Päivi Karppinen, University of Lapland, Faculty of Education, Centre for Media Pedagogy, Finland

Year

2005

Length

18 pages

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Keeping It Simple, Online and Personal: Teaching Interpersonal Communication Skills Via the World Wide Web

In this case study the authors discuss the creation of a digital video resource delivered via the WWW and CD-ROM for the teaching of interpersonal communication skills to distance students involved in a Masters of Library and Information Studies (MLIS) programme. The learning objectives of the resource, a walkthrough and an examination of the production of the digital video material are provided.

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Author

Stephen Marshall, Rowena Cullen, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Year

2003

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Audiences' judgements of speakers who use multimedia as a presentation aid: a contribution to training and assessment

Abstract: Multimedia technology in principle may help speakers to deliver more effective presentations. The present study examined what effectiveness might mean in terms of audience reaction. Understanding that may help educators to use multimedia more effectively themselves and to help their students to do so. Descriptors were elicited from audiences in response to a total of 56 live presentations in which speakers used multimedia as a presentation aid. Forty-two rating scales were defined. A total of 20 presentations were rated using the scales, with the scales presented in one of two different random orders. The order did not appear to affect the ratings. A factor analysis suggests that three factors may be most important in describing the audiences responses. The first describes audience assessment of how well researched and informative the presentation seemed. The second concerns the design of the multimedia, including how creative and imaginative it was. The third reflects how entertaining and how much fun the audience felt the experience as a whole to be. The results suggest a three-factor model that might be useful when designing multimedia-supported presentations, for providing proactive guidance and feedback when training speakers, and for assessment purposes.

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Author

Bruce Christie, Jenny Collyer, London Metropolitan University, UK

Year

2005

ISBN

ISSN-0007-1013

Length

22 pages

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The Use of Video as a teaching resource in a new university

Abstract: This paper reports on a survey of the use of video as a teaching resource within one British University, drawing on evidence gathered during 1995 from fourteen Schools within its four Faculties. It identifies the factors and issues which influence the use of video in teaching, including management of video resources within the Schools; how video is used to support teaching strategies; and its perceived usefulness as a teaching resource. Findings note the extent to which video is used across the University; the factors that support or discourage its use; and the awareness and expectations that teaching staff have of video as a teaching tool. The discussion offers some recommendations as to how video use may be supported and improved within the University. The research could form the basis for a larger study to establish whether the findings from this survey may be typical of the picture in higher education generally.

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Author

Barford J., Weston C., School of Information and Media, The Robert Gordon University, UK

Year

1997

Length

10 pages

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On-line video media for continuing professional development in dentistry

This project investigated the exploitation of on-line video media for the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) of dentists. More specifically it focused on the evolution of the video media from video-conferencing to simple and complex webcasting. The study aimed to establish models of best practice for the use of both videoconferencing and webcasting in the training of dentists.

The three phases in the investigation progressed from a single screen presentation to three frame webcasting.
• Phase 1 consisted of videoconferencing and one-frame webcasting across the local area network (LAN).
• Phase 2 was a two-frame webcast across the LAN.
• Phase 3 a three-frame webcast across the Internet.

In each phase three different teaching scenarios were compared the lecture, seminar and one-to-one delivery. The same presenter and teaching material (Medical Emergencies) were used in each setting. The majority of participants were about to qualify as dental surgeons. A qualitative analysis was employed using questionnaires with a 5-point Likert scale, interviews and observational techniques. In the questionnaire, presentational, technical and educational issues were investigated. What clearly emerged was the very positive reaction towards the video media which were considered a most acceptable mode of delivering CPD (rated very good and good more than 80% of the time). Similarly, the presenter and teaching material scored highly in all phases and scenarios (good to very good, 4-5 on the Likert scale). Video-conferencing was deemed more suitable to special occasions such as major lectures, and webcasting was preferred in a one-to-one setting. Technically, webcasting did not make extra demands on the presenter, audio was more reliable and set up times were minimal compared to videoconferencing. However, sufficient webcasting bandwidth was necessary to prevent web-congestion. 'Interactivity' was essential to both recipient and presenter. It was appreciated most in Phase 3 webcasting where the chat box gave time to reflect before responding. A 'learning line' was proposed with videoconferencing and webcasting as part of the spectrum between face-to-face and on-line learning, respectively.

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Patricia A. Reynolds, Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, GKT Dental Institute, King's College London, UK Robin Mason, Institute of Educational Technology, The Open University, UK

Year

2002

ISBN

ISSN:0360-1315

Length

33 pages

Tags

Evaluating the use of streaming video to support student learning in a first-year life sciences course for student nurses

Streaming video was used to support the learning of first year student nurses on a Life Sciences module, as one of many innovations designed to increase the range of resources and support available to students. This paper describes the background to this innovation, the procedures adopted and the results of extensive evaluation. The use of streaming video was evaluated in three applications in the module. A total of 656 students used online directed-learning sessions that incorporated streamed video. Just over half of these students actually viewed the video streams. Their feedback showed that 32% found access easy, 59% enjoyed using the resources, and 25% were very confident that they learned from them. Different types of video were used, and embedded in diverse ways, but the results were consistent across the three applications. They suggest that streamed video can contribute to useful resources to support learning by student nurses but, for a variety of reasons, it may not appeal or be adequately accessible to all students at present.

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Sue M Green, David Voegeli, Maureen Harrison, Jackie Phillips, Jess Knowles, Mike Weaver, Dr. Kerry L. Shephard, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Division of Acute Care Nursing, University of Southampton, UK

Year

2003

ISBN

ISSN-0260-6917

Length

9 pages

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Video Streaming in Online Learning

The use of video in teaching and learning is a common practice in education today. As learning online becomes more of a common practice in education, streaming video and audio will play a bigger role in delivering course materials to online learners. This form of technology brings courses alive by allowing online learners to use their visual and auditory senses to learn complex concepts and difficult procedures. This article offers an overview of using streaming video in the online educational environment and discusses the various formats of streaming media. The various hardware and software programs used to create streaming video are also examined along with the advantages and drawbacks of using streaming video in online instruction. Finally, a discussion of how streaming video can be used in online instruction and its curricular applications are addressed.

Table of contents: 

• Overview of Video Streaming
• The Technology behind Video Streaming
• Advantages of Using Streaming Video
• Limitations to Consider
• Guidelines and Recommendations
• Curricular Applications
• Conclusions
• References

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Author

Taralynn Hartsell, Steve Chi-Yin Yuen, The University of Southern Mississippi, USA

Year

2006

ISBN

ISSN 1065-6901

Length

12 pages

Tags

Streaming in the Digital Video Realm

This paper offers an overview of streaming video and discusses the different formats of streaming media. Various hardware and software programs used to create streaming video is examined. In addition, the paper discusses the advantages and drawbacks of using streaming video in online teaching. Finally, a discussion of how streaming video can be used in online learning and its curricular applications are addressed.

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Author

Taralynn Hartsell, Steve Chi-Yin Yuen, The University of Southern Mississippi, USA

Year

2003

Length

3 pages

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