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Screen It

Screen It is Australia's national moving image competition for school students.

Designed to encourage imagination and inventiveness in Australia's primary and secondary school students, Screen It fosters a new generation of young moving image makers.

In 2008 entrants are asked to create works responding to the theme of 'Australian Identity'.

What does it mean to be Australian today? How may this change in the future? What has it meant in the past?

Table of contents: 

Primary School Categories:
Exploring the theme of Australian Identity
> Animation
> Live Action
> A computer game (using Klick & Play or Game Maker)

Secondary School Categories:
Exploring the theme of Australian Identity
> Animation
> Live Action
> A computer game (using Adobe Flash or Game Maker)

Link

Format

Language

Country

Level

Author

Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI)

Year

up-to-date

Tags

Five Key Questions That Can Change the World: Deconstruction

Five Key Questions That Can Change the World: Deconstruction, is an innovative collection of 25 cornerstone lesson plans - five for each of CML's Five Key Questions of media literacy for consumers. Developed by the Center for Media Literacy, it's a ready-to-go resource that will help you help your students build a firm foundation in the skills of media literacy.
“Where do I start?” is a cry often heard from teachers who wish to introduce media literacy to their classrooms. Five Key Questions that can Change the World is an innovative collection of 25 cornerstone lesson plans – five for each of CML’s Five Key Questions of media literacy for deconstruction. The lessons are scalable activities from kindergarten through high school, and include both analysis activities and creative production projects. These sample lessons correlate with national (USA) education standards in language arts and social studies and integrate well with health, math and the arts.

NOTE: This is not a free resource, it costs $14.95 and can be ordered online at www.medialit.com/store

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Five Key Questions That Can Change the World: Deconstruction (Cinco preguntas clave que pueden cambiar el mundo: deconstrucción) es una innovadora colección de 25 planes de lección fundamentales - cinco para cada una de cinco preguntas clave de CML sobre la alfabetización mediática de los consumidores. Desarrollado por el Centro para la Educación Media, que es un recurso ya preparado que le ayudará a ayudar a sus estudiantes a construir una base sólida en las habilidades de la alfabetización mediática.
"¿Por dónde empiezo?" Es un grito a menudo escuchado de profesores que deseen introducir la alfabetización mediática a sus aulas. Las lecciones son actividades escalables desde el jardín de infancia hasta la escuela secundaria, e incluyen tanto las actividades de análisis y proyectos creativos de producción. Estas lecciones ejemplares se relacionan con los estándares nacionales de educación (EE.UU.) en artes del lenguaje y estudios sociales y se integran bien con la salud, las matemáticas y las artes.
NOTA: Esto no es un recurso gratuito, cuesta $ 14.95 y se pueden pedir en línea en www.medialit.com /

System requirements: 
PDF reader

Link

Format

Language

Country

Level

Author

Jeff Share, Tessa Jolls & Elizabeth Thoman, Center for Media Literacy (CML)

Year

2007

Length

85 pages

Tags

Technology Corner: Instructional Video (ITV) & Teleconferencing

Instructional Video (ITV) & Teleconferencing. Describes the underlying technology and use of instructional video (ITV) & interactive teleconferencing. Reviews facility and planning considerations and provides useful guidelines for enhancing both communication and the teaching/learning process.

Link

Format

Language

Country

Level

Author

University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ)

Length

link repository: 17 links

Tags

Playing Video Games Motives, Responses, and Consequences

From security training simulations to war games to role-playing games, to sports games to gambling, playing video games has become a social phenomena, and the increasing number of players that cross gender, culture, and age is on a dramatic upward trajectory. Playing Video Games: Motives, Responses, and Consequences integrates communication, psychology, and technology to examine the psychological and mediated aspects of playing video games. It is the first volume to delve deeply into these aspects of computer game play. It fits squarely into the media psychology arm of entertainment studies, the next big wave in media studies. The book targets one of the most popular and pervasive media in modern times, and it will serve to define the area of study and provide a theoretical spine for future research.

This unique and timely volume will appeal to scholars, researchers, and graduate students in media studies and mass communication, psychology, and marketing.

Table of contents: 

Foreword. Preface.
P. Vorderer, J. Bryant, K.M. Pieper, R. Weber, Playing Video Games as Entertainment.
M. Sellers, Designing the Experience of Interactive Play.

Part I: The Product. H. Lowood, A Brief Biography of Computer Games.
B.P. Smith, The (Computer) Games People Play.
S. Smith, Perps, Pimps, and Provocative Clothing: Examining Negative Content Patterns in Video Games.
E. Chan, P. Vorderer, Massively Multiplayer Online Games.

Part II: Motivation and Selection.
G.C. Klug, J. Schell, Why People Play Games: An Industry Perspective.
P. Ohler, G. Nieding, Why Play? An Evolutionary Perspective.
T. Hartmann, C. Klimmt, The Influence of Personality Factors on Computer Game Choice.
C. Klimmt, T. Hartmann, Effectance, Self-Efficacy, and the Motivation to Play Video Games.
M. von Salisch, C. Oppl, A. Kristen, What Attracts Children?
A.A. Raney, J.K. Smith, K. Baker, Adolescents and the Appeal of Video Games.
J. Bryant, J. Davies, Selective Exposure to Video Games.

Part III: Reception and Reaction Processes.
D. Williams, A Brief Social History of Game Play.
J.L. Sherry, K. Lucas, B.S. Greenberg, K. Lachlan, Video Game Uses and Gratifications as Predicators of Use and Game Preference.
R. Tamborini, P. Skalski, The Role of Presence in the Experience of Electronic Games.
S.M. Zehnder, S.D. Lipscomb, The Role of Music in Video Games.
K.M. Lee, N. Park, S-A. Jin, Narrative and Interactivity in Computer Games.
M.A. Shapiro, J. Pe¤a-Herborn, J.T. Hancock, Realism, Imagination, and Narrative Video Games.
A-S. Axelsson, T. Regan, Playing Online.
F.F. Steen, P.M. Greenfield, M.S. Davies, B. Tynes, What Went Wrong With The Sims Online: Cultural Learning and Barriers to Identification in a Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game.

Part IV: Effects and Consequences.
K.M. Lee, W. Peng, What Do We Know About Social and Psychological Effects of Computer Games? A Comprehensive Review of the Current Literature.
R. Weber, U. Ritterfeld, A. Kostygina, Aggression and Violence as Effects of Playing Violent Video Games?
K.E. Buckley, C.A. Anderson, A Theoretical Model of the Effects and Consequences of Playing Video Games. D.A. Lieberman, What Can We Learn From Playing Interactive Games?
U. Ritterfeld, R. Weber, Video Games for Entertainment and Education.
K. Durkin, Game Playing and Adolescents' Development.

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