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Tux Paint

Tux Paint is a free drawing program for children (3 to 12) that combines an easy-to-use interface, fun sound effects, and an encouraging cartoon mascot who guides children as they use the program. It is used in schools around the world as a computer literacy drawing activity.
The program runs on multiple platforms. It’s simple interface presents a number of useful drawing tools and at the same time relieve the user of the need to think about the technical details.
Sound and visual helps are available: fun sound effects are played when tools are selected and used and a cartoon mascot appears at the bottom to give tips, hints and information.
Parts of Tux Paint have currently been translated into almost 100 languages.
Stamps, starters and brushes are stored using popular open formats (PNG, SVG, Ogg Vorbis, etc.) allowing parents and teachers to create their own content for use at home or in the classroom - even using completely free tools.
The 'Tux Paint Config.' program allows parents, teachers, and school technicians to alter Tux Paint's behaviour using a simple, easy-to-use graphical interface.

System requirements: 
Operating System Requirement Windows: Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows Me, Windows NT 4, Windows 2000, Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7 Mac OS X: Requires Mac OS X, version 10.3.9 or later Linux: (No special OS requirements) Disk Space Requirement Note: Disk space requirements are for the base installation. Obviously, as you create and save images using Tux Paint, more disk space will be used. Tux Paint Windows: Approx. 16MB Mac OS X: Approx. 16MB Linux: Approx. 16MB Tux Paint Stamps (Full installation) Windows: Add Approx. 70MB Mac OS X: Add Approx. 70MB Linux: Add Approx. 70MB Minimum Recommended CPU Windows: 200MHz Pentium Mac OS X: 233MHz G3 Linux: 200MHz Pentium, 233MHz G3, etc. Peripheral Requirements Monitor: 640x480 or higher; 800x600 recommended Video Card: Capable of 640x480, 16bpp (thousands of colors) or better; 1024x768 or better, 24bpp recommended Mouse: One button mouse or better; scrollwheel supported, but not required; (any device that acts as a mouse is supported, e.g.: touchscreen, drawing tablet, tablet PC, trackball, lightpen, etc.) Memory (RAM) Requirements At default resolution (800x600) Windows: Approx. 40MB free Mac OS X: Approx. 16MB free Linux: Approx. 33MB free At smallest resolution (640x480) Windows: Approx. 28MB free Mac OS X: Approx. 32MB free Linux: Approx. 24MB free At very-large resolution (1600x1200) Windows: Approx. 150MB free Mac OS X: Approx. 55MB free Linux: Approx. 140MB free

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Author

Bill Kendrick (Lead Developer) et al.

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ccMixter

"ccMixter is a community music site featuring remixes licensed under Creative Commons where you can listen to, sample, mash-up, or interact with music in whatever way you want. Remixers can apply sampling, remixing and mash-ups, grab the sample packs and a cappellas for download and can upload their version back into ccMixter, for others to enjoy and re-sample."
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Related: “Is it legal?”, http://ccmixter.org/isitlegal

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System requirements: 
Web browser

Unterrichtsvideos als Medium der Lehrerinnen- und Lehrerbildung

How to exploit the potential of videos in teacher's training.

Table of contents: 

Unterrichtsvideos in Forschung und Lehre (Educational videos in research and teaching)
Medienspezifisches Potential von Unterrichtsvideos für Forschung und Lehrerbildung (media-related potential of educational video for research and teachers’ training)
Formen des Einsatzes von Unterrichtsvideos in der Lehre (Concepts of using educational videos in teaching)
Lernen durch Reflexion und Analyse von Unterrichtsvideos (Teaching by reflecting and analysing educational videos)
Herausforderungen bei der Reflexion und Analyse von Unterrichtsvideos in der Lehre (Challenges in reflecting and analysing educational videos in teaching)
Forschung zum Einsatz von Videos in der Lehrerbildung (Research about the use of educational videos in teachers’ training)

System requirements: 
Acrobat Reader

Meaningful Learning with Digital and Online Videos: Theoretical Perspectives

Abstract on Ed/ITLib: "In this paper theoretical perspectives for analyzing the pedagogical meaningfulness of using videos in teaching, studying and learning are presented and discussed with a special focus on using digital and online video materials. The theoretical arguments were applied in the international JIBS – Joint Inserts Bank for Schools project (see < http://www.ebu.ch/departments/television/co_finance/jibs.php>). Out of existing theoretical literature six characteristics of meaningful learning were selected. According to these characteristics, meaningful learning is 1) active, 2) constructive and individual, 3) collaborative and conversational, 4) contextual, 5) guided, and 6) emotionally involving and motivating. In this paper, these characteristics are discussed with a special focus on learning with digital and online video materials. The characteristics provide insights into how digital and online videos can be used in a pedagogically meaningful way in teaching, studying and learning processes. It is evident that videos viewed either through television or computer can be seen as tools for learning. However, videos are just one component in the complexity of a classroom activity system. The learning outcomes depend largely on the way videos are used as part of the overall learning environment, e.g. how viewing or producing videos is integrated into other learning resources and tasks."

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Päivi Karppinen, University of Lapland, Faculty of Education, Centre for Media Pedagogy, Finland

Year

2005

Length

18 pages

Tags

Using filmmaking to teach students about Shakespeare, Urban Regeneration and other stuff!

Publication, presented at DIVERSE 2006.

Table of contents: 

Content:
* using video to enhance student learning by engaging with their subject area in a novel way
* results have been highly successful
* the presentation will highlight the skills and knowledge that students can acquire

Selectie van de testlaboratoria - Digitale fototoestellen - Zomer 2007

FNAC lists differences, advantages & disadvantages of a numerous amount of digital cameras (not camcorders).

FNAC lijst verschillen, voordelen en nadelen op van een groot aantal digitale camera's (geen camcorders).

BEELDSPRAAK 2

This PDF is meant for audiovisual students but can be freely downloaded. It combines guidelines with assignments.

Deze PDF is bedoeld voor audiovisuele studenten maar can vrij gedownload worden. Het combineert richtlijnen met opdrachten.

System requirements: 
Acrobat Reader

Video-Arbeit lohnt sich!

Article about using video in an academic secondary school with focus on economics.

System requirements: 
Acrobat Reader

Keeping It Simple, Online and Personal: Teaching Interpersonal Communication Skills Via the World Wide Web

In this case study the authors discuss the creation of a digital video resource delivered via the WWW and CD-ROM for the teaching of interpersonal communication skills to distance students involved in a Masters of Library and Information Studies (MLIS) programme. The learning objectives of the resource, a walkthrough and an examination of the production of the digital video material are provided.

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Stephen Marshall, Rowena Cullen, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Year

2003

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Case studies

The case studies show different ways that filmmaking was integrated into the academic context.

Table of contents: 

Genesis and Genre - Since film was a core part of the module, students spent a considerable part of their classroom time studying films and learning about filmmaking. They worked in groups to produce short dramatised sections of novels and plays by Galdós.

Understanding Law II - Students were asked to make a group-based presentation in an electronic format of their choice - video, podcast, screencast or a combination. Students had a two-hour workshop on shooting and editing, then worked independently.

Architecture - Post-graduate architecture students were offered the opportunity to use filmmaking as part of a large final project. They worked with a Norwegian filmmaker and had professional help in the form of 'master-classes' from Sheffield based filmmakers, then went on to make their own films.

Filming Shakespeare - Students were encouraged to creatively interpret a section of a Shakespeare play. Working in groups they storyboarded, directed and edited, with the support of a film crew.

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Author

Claire Allam (content) & Danny Monaghan (design), Learning Development and Media Unit, University of Sheffield

Year

2007

Length

4 case studies

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