downloadable

Selectie van de testlaboratoria - Digitale fototoestellen - Zomer 2008

FNAC lists differences, advantages & disadvantages of a numerous amount of digital cameras (not camcorders)

Using Video in Training and Education

Show us a story

Describing ways to use video in class - putting a focus on the respective product of the bfi.

Table of contents: 

Tasks of media pedagogy (media education)
The British Film Institute and moving image media education
Media pedagogy in the English curriculum
Media pedagogy in English schools
Moving image media education in primary schools
Moving image media education as perception training
Show us a story
Moving images in the classroom
Teaching with short movies
Story shorts and literacy
Starting Stories
Screening Shorts
Short movies in class

System requirements: 
Acrobat Reader

The Use of Video as a teaching resource in a new university

Abstract: This paper reports on a survey of the use of video as a teaching resource within one British University, drawing on evidence gathered during 1995 from fourteen Schools within its four Faculties. It identifies the factors and issues which influence the use of video in teaching, including management of video resources within the Schools; how video is used to support teaching strategies; and its perceived usefulness as a teaching resource. Findings note the extent to which video is used across the University; the factors that support or discourage its use; and the awareness and expectations that teaching staff have of video as a teaching tool. The discussion offers some recommendations as to how video use may be supported and improved within the University. The research could form the basis for a larger study to establish whether the findings from this survey may be typical of the picture in higher education generally.

Link

Format

Language

Country

Author

Barford J., Weston C., School of Information and Media, The Robert Gordon University, UK

Year

1997

Length

10 pages

Tags

The filmmaker's toolkit

This toolkit provides practical help and inspiration for students and staff interested in making films. With manual: online or downloadable as PDF (33 pages).
* Video technology has become easier to use, more available and far cheaper than ever before. More and more people are making their own videos and publishing them on the web, as YouTube testifies. But how do you get beyond ‘point and shoot' and what is the relevance of video production to education?
* Digital Video can be used in a number of ways in the classroom and the case studies show examples of a wide range of applications, together with student comment and reflection.
* The toolkit gives an overview of the filmmaking process, from initial idea to equipment needed to burning your DVD. It has been developed over several years and provides information and points to consider when making a film with an educational application in mind.
* The filmmaker's toolkit (downloadable as PDF) can be used as a standalone resource, in combination with workshops, or it can be more fully embedded into the learning and teaching of specific modules.

Table of contents: 

The toolkit
1 Preparation
* organising your thoughts
* storyboarding
* scripting
* describing shots
* preparing to shoot

2. Production
* using a camera
o moving shots
* shooting sequences
* lighting
o 3 point lighting
* sound recording
* white balance
* conducting interviews

3. Editing
* logging
* editing process
* special effects
* sound and music
* music copyright
* outputting your film

Link

Format

Language

Country

Level

Author

Claire Allam (content) & Danny Monaghan (design), Learning Development and Media Unit, University of Sheffield

Year

2007

Length

33 pages

Tags

Media Literacy Clearinghouse

A web site designed for K-12 educators who want to:
- learn more about media literacy
- integrate it into classroom instruction
- help students read the media
- help students become more media aware

Students in the director's seat: Teaching and learning across the school curriculum with student-generated video.

Several links and papers concerning student-developed digital video. Schuck, S. & Kearney, M. (2004). Students in the director's seat: Teaching and learning across the school curriculum with student-generated video. (This study was funded by a UTS Industry Links Research Grant with Apple Computers Australia. )

Project Description
This project investigated the value and use of student-generated digital video for enhancing pedagogy in K-12 schools. It aimed to identify, examine and analyse pedagogical practices in relation to use of this technology in five case schools. A further aim was to articulate the principles, contexts and approaches underlying these practices. An understanding of the practices and approaches which enhance or constrain pedagogy in these five cases will contribute to a future larger study. Principles of good practice developed in this study will be used to inform future research on models for enhancing pedagogy with digital video in education.

Vorbereitende Überlegungen zur Unterrichtspraxis IV, Video/Film

Interviews with experts about how to "teach film".

Table of contents: 

Gespräch mit Christine Dollhofer (Interview with C.D.)
Gespräch mit Stefan Kurowski
Gespräch mit Gustav Ernst
Further exercises
Allgemeine Überlegungen zur Unterrichtbarkeit vonVideo/Film (General considerations about teachability of video/film)

System requirements: 
Acrobat Reader

On-line video media for continuing professional development in dentistry

This project investigated the exploitation of on-line video media for the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) of dentists. More specifically it focused on the evolution of the video media from video-conferencing to simple and complex webcasting. The study aimed to establish models of best practice for the use of both videoconferencing and webcasting in the training of dentists.

The three phases in the investigation progressed from a single screen presentation to three frame webcasting.
• Phase 1 consisted of videoconferencing and one-frame webcasting across the local area network (LAN).
• Phase 2 was a two-frame webcast across the LAN.
• Phase 3 a three-frame webcast across the Internet.

In each phase three different teaching scenarios were compared the lecture, seminar and one-to-one delivery. The same presenter and teaching material (Medical Emergencies) were used in each setting. The majority of participants were about to qualify as dental surgeons. A qualitative analysis was employed using questionnaires with a 5-point Likert scale, interviews and observational techniques. In the questionnaire, presentational, technical and educational issues were investigated. What clearly emerged was the very positive reaction towards the video media which were considered a most acceptable mode of delivering CPD (rated very good and good more than 80% of the time). Similarly, the presenter and teaching material scored highly in all phases and scenarios (good to very good, 4-5 on the Likert scale). Video-conferencing was deemed more suitable to special occasions such as major lectures, and webcasting was preferred in a one-to-one setting. Technically, webcasting did not make extra demands on the presenter, audio was more reliable and set up times were minimal compared to videoconferencing. However, sufficient webcasting bandwidth was necessary to prevent web-congestion. 'Interactivity' was essential to both recipient and presenter. It was appreciated most in Phase 3 webcasting where the chat box gave time to reflect before responding. A 'learning line' was proposed with videoconferencing and webcasting as part of the spectrum between face-to-face and on-line learning, respectively.

Link

Format

Language

Country

Author

Patricia A. Reynolds, Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, GKT Dental Institute, King's College London, UK Robin Mason, Institute of Educational Technology, The Open University, UK

Year

2002

ISBN

ISSN:0360-1315

Length

33 pages

Tags

Creative activity and its impact on student learning - issues of implementation

(Abstract) The use of filmmaking as a creative learning tool within the academic curriculum has been pioneered at the University of Sheffield. Filmmaking has been found to promote a lively, exciting and challenging environment in the classroom. It produces highly motivated students and makes learning fun by giving them a sense of empowerment and achievement. Perhaps more importantly, it allows students to tap into their creativity and imagination - abilities identified by many as the passport to a successful future. This paper covers a number of examples which describe the benefits to student learning; these include close engagement with their subject leading to insight and deeper understanding, as well as a range of transferable skills. This successful practice is looked at in relation to issues of assessment, evaluation and cost. Using a methodological approach that employs qualitative feedback interviews with students as research data, as well as referring to the literature, it presents a case for sustainable implementation.

Published in journal Innovations in Education and Teaching International, Volume 45, Issue 3 August 2008 , pages 281 - 288.

Link

Format

Language

Country

Level

Author

Claire Allam, Learning and Teaching Services, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK

Year

2008

ISBN

DOI: 10.1080/14703290802176196

Length

7 pages

Tags

Sponsors and Exhibitors

MediaSite Kaltura Panopto
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