media in education

Using existing streaming media to teach science

"A growing number of schools in Europe already have computer laboratories utilizing modern computers. Introductory courses on ICT are already integrated in primary school curricula or soon will be. It is about time, therefore, to revise existing or develop new ICT curricula. Something different, more advanced, and more exciting is needed, therefore, for the high school (and lyceum) curricula. We believe that one possible course of action would be to integrate the curriculum ICT teaching with the teaching of different subjects, while at the same time to combine different learning methods by paying more emphasis to students’ own actions and self-directed learning abilities. We believe that by combining tasks in the way shown in this paper, will prove to be very beneficial to the students.

In education, the omnipresence of the web and the increased communications bandwidth has created, in effect, an integrated educational medium. Web-based video streaming technologies are expected to experience a rapid adoption by students and educators. In addition to maintaining the more traditional activities like text conferencing, whiteboards, video conferencing etc, video sequences can be integrated with or linked to slides by the use of simple use of ordinary internet browsers. This results to a seamless integration of digital video with other tools, hereby creating a Virtual Learning Environment. It also offers the opportunity to move beyond one-way video towards an interactive medium that complements, and adds visual richness to static text and graphic content.

It is possible for streaming media to become a ubiquitous form of communication and to find application in every classroom. Nevertheless, there is currently an acute lack of research dealing with the use of existing streaming media for teaching and learning, despite the fact that streaming video is one of the best methods for introducing ICT (for the first time) in everyday school practice. In this paper, the results of an attempt to teach science using existing streaming media are presented."

Relevant resource: The Science Laboratory demo site

From the same author(s): "Streaming media as an alternative to direct student instruction for performing science experiments" PDF (http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/19/72/84/PDF/167_Final_Paper.pdf) and "Bridging the gap between digital technology and science education" (http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/freeabs_all.jsp?arnumber=4381181)

Table of contents: 

1. Introduction
2. The educational problem
3. The research
4. Team formation
5. The new teaching approach
6. Conclusions, educational observations, and discussion

System requirements: 
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D. M. Garyfallidou, A. K. Grigoropoulos, and G. S. Ioannidis, University of Patras.

Year

2006

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9 pages

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Literacy for the 21st Century: 2nd Edition

This book provides an overview & orientation guide to media literacy education with CML's plain language introduction to the basic elements of inquiry-based media education.

How does media literacy relate to the construction of media? How can critical thinking be taught and learned while students are producing media? It's not enough to know how to press buttons on technological equipment: thinking is even more important. Find out how to connect thinking with production. In a short and readable format, this book:
* Provides a complete framework for critical inquiry, using CML’s Five Core Concepts, and Five Key Questions for both construction and deconstruction of media, along with handouts.
* Gives explanations and Guiding Questions to illustrate how to connect the Key Questions when consuming or producing or participating with media.
* Provides in-depth explanations and the foundational role of the Five Key Questions of Media Literacy.
* Offers a sample inquiry into visual language: "How to Conduct a ‘Close Analysis' of a Media ‘Text.'"

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Developed and written by Elizabeth Thoman Founder Tessa Jolls President / CEO Revised and expanded by Tessa Jolls President / CEO Center for Media Literacy

Year

2008

Length

87 pages

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Video Gaming, Education and Digital Learning Technologies: Relevance and Opportunities - References

This is a web page from 2002, where references are listed concerning video games, games and education.

Mathematical motivation

MOTIVATE was a real-time videoconferencing project for schools, providing maths, science and cross-curricular videoconferences and linked projects for students of all ages (5-19) both in the UK and internationally. Although the live VC programme ceased in 2010, they are developping multimedia packs, providing collaborative investigative resources that contain a range of resources - short video clips, classroom activities and games, topical issues for discussion, student worksheets, and teacher notes.

Younger children take part in interactive videoconferences, with activities based across the curriculum.
Related: Paper “Can videoconferencing contribute to teaching and learning? The experience of the Motivate Project” by Jenny Gage, Marilyn Nickson, Toni Beardon, University of Cambridge, 2002. http://www.leeds.ac.uk/educol/documents/00002264.htm

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Motivate Project - mathematical videoconferencing for schools

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up-to-date

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Free Science Videos and Lectures Free Education Online is Possible!

Collection of free scientifical videos for educational purposes.

Table of contents: 

Video Categories
* Animals
* Astronomy
* Biology
* Chemistry
* Genetics
* Physics
* Technology
* Water Life
* Weather
Recent Videos
Recent Lectures

Project Look Sharp

An initiative to promote and support the integration of media literacy into classroom curricula at all grade levels and instructional areas, as well as to evaluate the effectiveness of media literacy education in the schools.

System requirements: 
Adobe Reader

Video in Theory and Practice: Issues for Classroom Use and Teacher Video Evaluation

A paper about getting the most educational value out of viewing videos in the classroom and providing special attention to evaluation. Including useful guidelines for pre-activity, activity, and post-activity: how to implement video practically, time-wise and goal-oriented into a lesson plan.

"Video is an educational media with a foremost place in current and future education,
even in the context of growing interest in ‘interactive multimedia’. Through
thoughtful planning, video instruction can be used to promote ‘interactive’ learning,
in the best sense of the word – the sense of active learning described in this article.
Videos can be used to help promote student curiosity, speculation and intellectual
engagement. They can help promote group learning discussions and activities allowing
learners to use knowledge they already have and higher-order cognitive skills
required to extend their knowledge. In combination with other instructional strategies,
videos can allow learners to make their own input into learning experiences
and to realize the personal importance of learning itself. It is up to the teacher to
develop processes and circumstances to get the most ‘interactive learning’ value
from video and to help bring the video experience into the real world of the student
as learner."

Table of contents: 

Introduction
Are videos inherently more effective than other types of learning resources?
Strengths of video
Instructional design in video - what research says
Background to video utilization techniques - Active Learning
General Principles of Video Use in the classroom
Pre-Activity: Preparing for the viewing experience
The Activity: General aspects of viewing the video
The Activity: Using video to promote active learning
Post-Activity: Activities to consolidate the video viewing experience
Evaluating educational videos
Positives to look for during video evaluation
Flags to look for during video evaluation
Discussion/Summary

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David Denning, InNATURE Productions and University of Victoria

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10 pages

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Digital Ethnography, a Vision of Students Today

This blog is maintained by a Kansas State University working group led by Dr. Michael Wesch dedicated to exploring and extending the possibilities of digital ethnography.

In 2007 Dr. Michael Wesch and a group of students of Kansas State University published two videos. They introduce themselves as: “a Kansas State University working group led by Dr. Michael Wesch dedicated to exploring and extending the possibilities of digital ethnography.” The video “A Vision of Students Today” gives a look into what students are really using technology for… where students are really spending their time: http://mediatedcultures.net/ksudigg/?p=119Related:
- Showcase / Mediated Culture, http://mediatedcultures.net/mediatedculture.htm
- video of 2007, summarizing some of the most important characteristics of students today - how they learn, what they need to learn, their goals, hopes, dreams, what their lives will be like, and what kinds of changes they will experience in their lifetime. The video was created by Michael Wesch in collaboration with 200 students at Kansas State University: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dGCJ46vyR9o&feature=player_embedded

What games have to teach us

This is an article from The Guardian by John Kirriemuir. He is an independent researcher and consultant who has a blog at http://www.silversprite.com.

National Association for Media Literacy Education (NAMLE)

The National Association for Media Literacy Education (formerly Alliance for a Media Literate America) is a national membership organization dedicated to advancing the field of media literacy education in the United States. While much of this website showcases the programs and activities of NAMLW, this section provides information on NAMLE as a national non-profit organization - its history, how it runs, by-laws & policies, elections, boards and more.

Sponsors and Exhibitors

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