research

Connecting digital literacy between home and school

This report is the result of a seven-month research project into the connections and discontinuities between children’s digital literacy practices at home and in school. It formed one strand of a larger project exploring children’s digital participation.

This report provides a brief introduction to the research project, setting out the key ideas underpinning the research, and describes the research project and methods used. It then presents and explores findings from the research, drawing out some common themes and discussing challenges and opportunities for connecting children’s digital literacy between home and school.

This report aims to provide evidence of children’s current digital literacy practices, where there are opportunities for connections to be developed or established between home and school, and where there are disconnections that may need to be addressed. This report is likely to be of interest to researchers and primary and secondary teachers interested in the field of digital literacy.

Table of contents: 

About this report
Introduction
The study
Findings
Discussion and conclusions
References
Acknowledgements

Link

Format

Language

Country

Author

Lyndsay Grant, Futurelab

Year

2010

Length

20 pages

Tags

A report on “The Digital World of Young Children: Emergent Literacy”

In 2010 Pearson Foundation published a report entitled "The Digital World of Young Children: Impact on Emergent Literacy” which addresses the importance of studying the effect of digital media on young minds. Written by Jay Blanchard and Terry Moore from the Arizona State University College of Teacher Education and Leadership, this
report asks as many questions as it answers, will an increased access to digital media lead young children to self-direct their own learning process? What might be the effects of added digital stimuli on attention and comprehension?
On the webpage you can download the full report in pdf format.

Divis Project

The Divis project (Digital video streaming and multilingualism) is a European funded Project that run from October 2008 to September 2010. It aims to encourage, motivate and equip both teacher trainers and practising language teachers to include video production in their teaching.
The official report of the project is available here:
http://divisproject.eu/attachments/019_com_mp_141759_divis.pdf

Initial research was undertaken to establish how teachers feel about the use of video production and what skills and experience they had in this area. From the results of the research, the project team developed a online guide to address the teachers' needs, introducing creative and non-conventional teaching methods and samples to support implementation of video work in the classroom as well as providing technical support. The manual is available in many languages on the following webpage:
http://divisproject.eu/categoryblog/143-mini-guide-download-page

On the Divis project website, you can also find very good examples of usage of videos, photo stories, dramas, and television news in education. There is also a useful technical support section:
http://divisproject.eu/technical-support

Table of contents: 

Photo story, Video words, school presentations, drama, television news, technical support, Video gallery, download guide

Learning from History / Lernen aus der Geschichte

Learning & Teaching offers teachers and other educators a free-of-charge resource pool of educational materials and methodological ideas. This website provides web seminars on themes in the field of historical and civic education, presented by experts from both academic and practical teaching contexts. As a registered user, you can take part in web seminars in real time and ask your own questions. Members can also share their own materials.

This website has four main areas: Learning & Teaching (in German), Participating & Networking, Learning Online & International Dialogue.

System requirements: 
Acrobat Reader, QuickTime

The Use of Video as a teaching resource in a new university

Abstract: This paper reports on a survey of the use of video as a teaching resource within one British University, drawing on evidence gathered during 1995 from fourteen Schools within its four Faculties. It identifies the factors and issues which influence the use of video in teaching, including management of video resources within the Schools; how video is used to support teaching strategies; and its perceived usefulness as a teaching resource. Findings note the extent to which video is used across the University; the factors that support or discourage its use; and the awareness and expectations that teaching staff have of video as a teaching tool. The discussion offers some recommendations as to how video use may be supported and improved within the University. The research could form the basis for a larger study to establish whether the findings from this survey may be typical of the picture in higher education generally.

Link

Format

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Country

Author

Barford J., Weston C., School of Information and Media, The Robert Gordon University, UK

Year

1997

Length

10 pages

Tags

Inside Cancer - Multimedia Guide to Cancer Biology

The different aspects of cancer are touched upon through animations, video with narration / sound effects or only slides/audio with doctors and researchers (transcript available).

This site also offers the option of Teacher Center, "to help your students understand how modern molecular and cellular genetics are integrated into ideas about cancer diagnosis, prevention, and treatment." By registering teachers receive access to the Inside Cancer Atomizer, a tool for building custom multimedia presentationswith content from Inside Cancer and other DNALC Internet sites.

Besides that there is also the Inside Cancer Lesson Plan Wiki community at http://teachercenter.insidecancer.org/icwiki/index.php/Main_Page where teachers can view, share and discuss related lesson plans.

Table of contents: 

Sections:
- Hallmarks of Cancer
- Causes and Prevention
- Diagnosis and Treatment
- Pathways to Cancer

Sitemap lists all subsections: http://www.insidecancer.org/sitemap.html

System requirements: 
Flash Player

Research projects about ICT in education

An overview of researches relevant to ICT in education, in Netherlands and outside.

Een overzicht van de onderzoeken in verband met ICT in educatie, in Nederland en daarbuiten.

imedias

The information center for digital media in school and education from a School of Education in Switzerland.

Table of contents: 

Unterricht (Education)
• Aktuell (latest)
• Praxis (in practice)
• Bild, Ton, Text (images, sound, text)
• Links

Lernmedien (educational media)
• Aktuell (latest)
• Offline Lernen (learning offline)
• Online Lernen (learning online)

Beratung (Consulting)
• Konzeptberatung (concept discussion)
• ICT-Entwicklungskonzept Solothurn (ICT development concept Solothurn)
• Prävention (prevention)
• Schulen im Netz (schools on the Internet)
• Freie Software (free software)

Weiterbildung (further education)
• Kurse (courses)
• Schulinterne Weiterbildung (school related further education)
• Pädagogischer Support (pedagogical support)
• Media Experts
• Veranstaltungen Rückblick (events – review)

Service
• Basel-Karlsruhe-Forum
• Termine (dates)
• Education-News
• Ausleihe (lending)
• Wikimedias
• Links
• Über uns (about us)

System requirements: 
Acrobat Reader

On-line video media for continuing professional development in dentistry

This project investigated the exploitation of on-line video media for the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) of dentists. More specifically it focused on the evolution of the video media from video-conferencing to simple and complex webcasting. The study aimed to establish models of best practice for the use of both videoconferencing and webcasting in the training of dentists.

The three phases in the investigation progressed from a single screen presentation to three frame webcasting.
• Phase 1 consisted of videoconferencing and one-frame webcasting across the local area network (LAN).
• Phase 2 was a two-frame webcast across the LAN.
• Phase 3 a three-frame webcast across the Internet.

In each phase three different teaching scenarios were compared the lecture, seminar and one-to-one delivery. The same presenter and teaching material (Medical Emergencies) were used in each setting. The majority of participants were about to qualify as dental surgeons. A qualitative analysis was employed using questionnaires with a 5-point Likert scale, interviews and observational techniques. In the questionnaire, presentational, technical and educational issues were investigated. What clearly emerged was the very positive reaction towards the video media which were considered a most acceptable mode of delivering CPD (rated very good and good more than 80% of the time). Similarly, the presenter and teaching material scored highly in all phases and scenarios (good to very good, 4-5 on the Likert scale). Video-conferencing was deemed more suitable to special occasions such as major lectures, and webcasting was preferred in a one-to-one setting. Technically, webcasting did not make extra demands on the presenter, audio was more reliable and set up times were minimal compared to videoconferencing. However, sufficient webcasting bandwidth was necessary to prevent web-congestion. 'Interactivity' was essential to both recipient and presenter. It was appreciated most in Phase 3 webcasting where the chat box gave time to reflect before responding. A 'learning line' was proposed with videoconferencing and webcasting as part of the spectrum between face-to-face and on-line learning, respectively.

Link

Format

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Author

Patricia A. Reynolds, Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, GKT Dental Institute, King's College London, UK Robin Mason, Institute of Educational Technology, The Open University, UK

Year

2002

ISBN

ISSN:0360-1315

Length

33 pages

Tags

Digital Ethnography, a Vision of Students Today

This blog is maintained by a Kansas State University working group led by Dr. Michael Wesch dedicated to exploring and extending the possibilities of digital ethnography.

In 2007 Dr. Michael Wesch and a group of students of Kansas State University published two videos. They introduce themselves as: “a Kansas State University working group led by Dr. Michael Wesch dedicated to exploring and extending the possibilities of digital ethnography.” The video “A Vision of Students Today” gives a look into what students are really using technology for… where students are really spending their time: http://mediatedcultures.net/ksudigg/?p=119Related:
- Showcase / Mediated Culture, http://mediatedcultures.net/mediatedculture.htm
- video of 2007, summarizing some of the most important characteristics of students today - how they learn, what they need to learn, their goals, hopes, dreams, what their lives will be like, and what kinds of changes they will experience in their lifetime. The video was created by Michael Wesch in collaboration with 200 students at Kansas State University: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dGCJ46vyR9o&feature=player_embedded

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