research

Blueprint for Interactive Classrooms: Handbook

"The Blueprint for Interactive Classrooms project is about designing and building interactive classrooms for teaching distant learners using various audio-visual technologies which allow teachers and learners to interact over a variety of telecommunications networks in a cost-effective and pedagogically sound manner.

This handbook provides step-by-step guidelines for designing, building and using interactive classrooms - tailored to specific needs - which promote telepresence with audio-visual technologies such as videoconferencing and television as the main means of communication."

You can download excerpts from some of its chapters.

Table of contents: 

1. Introduction
2. Building an Interactive Classroom: The steps
Task 1: Designing the Teaching and Learning Activity
Task 2: Designing the Teaching and Learning Environment
Task 3: Sound: A Key Requirement
Task 4: Choosing and Buying the Technology
Task 5: Furniture and other items
Task 6: Installing the Classroom
3. Testing it Works
4. How to Use the Classrooms:
Guidelines for Teachers
Guidelines for Learners
Guidelines for Tutors and Facilitators
Guidelines for Managers
Guidelines for Production/Technical Staff
Guidelines for Cleaning and Room Maintenance Staff
5. Troubleshooting
6. Case Studies:
University College Dublin, (UCD)
Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, (K.U.Leuven)
Université Nancy 2 (UN2)
Politecnico di Milano, (POLIMI)
Helsinki University of Technology (HUT)
Appendices
Glossary of Terms
World TV Standards
References and Further Reading
Websites
Index

Link

Format

Language

Country

Level

Author

Blueprint for Interactive Classrooms project: Lisa Kilbride, Anne Phelan, Mathy Vanbuel, Loïc Deconche, Sergio Brofferio, Luca Maderna, Tuovi Manninen, Tuomo Rintamäki, Ilija-Matias Lazarov

Year

1998

Length

270 pages

Tags

Video Gaming, Education and Digital Learning Technologies

This article presents an overview of video gaming and discusses how gaming is related and relevant to digital libraries and digital learning technologies. It suggests that these relationships are worthy of more detailed investigation.

The article begins with information about video games and gaming consoles, a comparison of consoles and the PC, and some observations on the network capabilities of consoles. Next, the relevance of gaming to academia is highlighted, and the relevance of games and consoles to learning technologies is considered. Emerging gaming platforms are explored, and the article concludes with some observations on future directions in video gaming and how the best and most relevant aspects of gaming can help create engaging and beneficial digital learning and research technologies.

Link

Format

Language

Country

Level

Author

John Kirriemuir

Year

2002

ISBN

D-Lib Magazine February 2002 Volume 8 Number 2 ISSN 1082-9873

Length

1 page

Tags

Students in the director's seat: Teaching and learning across the school curriculum with student-generated video.

Several links and papers concerning student-developed digital video. Schuck, S. & Kearney, M. (2004). Students in the director's seat: Teaching and learning across the school curriculum with student-generated video. (This study was funded by a UTS Industry Links Research Grant with Apple Computers Australia. )

Project Description
This project investigated the value and use of student-generated digital video for enhancing pedagogy in K-12 schools. It aimed to identify, examine and analyse pedagogical practices in relation to use of this technology in five case schools. A further aim was to articulate the principles, contexts and approaches underlying these practices. An understanding of the practices and approaches which enhance or constrain pedagogy in these five cases will contribute to a future larger study. Principles of good practice developed in this study will be used to inform future research on models for enhancing pedagogy with digital video in education.

Designing and implementing a PBL course on educational digital video production: Lessons learned from a design-based research

Article published in Educational Technology Research & Development.
This paper reports on a design-based research (DBR) process for designing, implementing, and refining a problem-based learning (PBL) course on educational digital video (DV) use and production at the University of Lapland’s Faculty of Education. The study focuses on the students’ learning processes and outcomes from the viewpoint of meaningful learning. The research subjects included two pilot students and ten students enrolled in the course. To promote the reliability of the findings, data of various kinds and from multiple sources were used, including video recordings of the PBL tutorial sessions. The results suggest that PBL offers a good model to support students’ knowledge and skills in producing and using educational DV. In addition, the results suggest that DV production can be used as a method to learn about the subject matter of the DVs.

Table of contents: 

Design-based research - Meaningful learning - Problem-based learning - Students-as-video-producers

Link

Format

Language

Country

Author

Päivi Hakkarainen

Year

2007

ISBN

ISSN 1042-1629 (Print) 1556-6501 (Online)

Length

Pages 211-228

Tags

British Film Institute (BFI) - Teaching Film and Media Studies

BFI Education publishes a growing range of teaching packs, teaching guides (many of which are free)and resources to support the use of moving image media in schools. These resources also include full lesson plans and sheets.

Particularly aimed at teachers new to Media Studies post-16, the series provides a wealth of information and new ideas for all teachers involved with the teaching of AS and A level Media Studies, (OCR, AQA and WJEC), AS and A level Film Studies (WJEC), GNVQ/AVCE, Btech, Scottish Highers/Advanced Highers, and Lifelong Learning courses.

What games have to teach us

This is an article from The Guardian by John Kirriemuir. He is an independent researcher and consultant who has a blog at http://www.silversprite.com.

It's A Bit Like Star Trek': The Effectiveness of Video Conferencing

This paper presents an evaluation of the effectiveness of video conferencing as a teaching and learning medium within the area of early childhood studies. The methodology consists of questionnaires administered to the early years' tutors who taught on the course and to students in both Belfast and Armagh (remote site). Findings indicate that students at the remote site have developed learning strategies and skills for dealing with the video-conference lecture. Tutors have had to adopt a formal style of teaching and this has had an effect on how lectures are presented. Furthermore, it is recognized by tutors and students that a tutor needs to be present at the remote site in order to facilitate discussion and deal with questions and problems.

Link

Format

Language

Country

Level

Author

Sheelagh Carville; Denise R. Mitchell

Year

2000

ISBN

ISSN: 1470-3300 (electronic) 1470-3297 (paper)

Length

pages 42 - 49

Tags

Towards Meaningful Learning through Digital Video Supported, Case Based Teaching

Article published in Australasian Journal of Educational Technology. This paper reports an action research case study in which a traditional lecture based, face to face Network Management course at the University of Lapland's Faculty of Social Sciences was developed into two different course versions resorting to case based teaching: a face to face version and an online version. In the face to face version, the teacher designed and produced three digital video supported case studies with the students to be used as learning material for the online version. The research focuses on finding out the student perspective on the following questions: (1) Can designing and producing digital video supported cases constitute a meaningful learning process for the students? (2) Can solving digital video supported cases in an online course support meaningful learning for the students? and (3) What roles do the digital videos play in the online students' meaningful learning process? The research indicates that both designing and producing, as well as solving the digital video supported cases, promoted especially the active and contextual aspects of the students' meaningful learning as well as the students' positive emotional involvement in the learning process. Several implications for further development of the Network Management course and for the development of university teaching across disciplines can be drawn from the results.

Link

Format

Language

Country

Author

Päivi Hakkarainen, Tarja Saarelainen and Heli Ruokamo, University of Lapland, Finland

Year

2007

Length

23 pages

Tags

Instructional Effectiveness of Video Media

"This review of the research literature regarding the use and effectiveness of video-based media seeks to summarize knowledge in the area. Focusing on empirical findings, the authors include work in educational and cognitive psychology, and communication and media research."

Table of contents: 

1. Introduction
2. Forms of Educational Television
3. Processing Visual and Verbal Information
4. Dynamic Visual Presentations
5. Computer-Based Interactive Video
6. Video Production Methods and Tradecraft
7. Production Methods and Learning
8. Learning, Mental Effort and the Perception of Media
9. Symbol Systems and Media
10. Perspectives on Video Media
11. Discussion and Conclusions

Link

Format

Language

Country

Level

Author

C. Douglas Wetzel, Paul H. Radtke, Hervey W. Stern

Year

1994

ISBN

ISBN-10: 0-8058-1698-4

Length

250 pages

Tags

Educational Games Research - Research and discussion concerning instructional video games

Educational Games Research Blog discusses topics related to academic research and media commentary concerning the use of video games in K-20 settings. It is maintained by John Rice, an educator, author and speaker specializing in educational technology and instructional gaming.

Sponsors and Exhibitors

MediaSite Kaltura Panopto
Ubicast WebClip2Go Kalyzée
Matrox Rapidmooc Crowdbeamer

Organisers